///New Device Unclogs Stroke Patient’s Veins in Brain
New Device Unclogs Stroke Patient’s Veins in Brain 2018-05-01T16:18:04+00:00

New Device Unclogs Stroke Patient’s Veins in Brain

UAMS’ Salah Keyrouz, M.D., examines
Glen Deaton six months after
Deatons nearly fatal stroke.

William Culp, M.D., is leading stroke research at UAMS with the EKOS machine, above, in Culps lab.

William Culp, M.D., is leading stroke
research at UAMS with the
EKOS machine, above, in Culp’s lab.

When UAMS patient Glen Deaton arrived at UAMS, large veins that drain blood from his brain were clotting. Salah Keyrouz, M.D., a UAMS stroke neurologist and Glen’s doctor, described it as the worst case he had ever seen. “I didn’t think he was going to make it,” Dr. Keyrouz said.

An MRI revealed cerebral venous sinus thrombosis a type of stroke caused by a clot that in Glen’s case ran from the top of his head nearly to his neck. Glen subsequently had a seizure, became unresponsive and had to be put on a ventilator.

Keyrouz called on UAMS’ Eren Erdem, M.D., director of interventional radiology, and Mollie Atherton, M.D., interventional radiology fellow. Drs. Erdem and Atherton had a breakthrough in Glen’s treatment when they next tried a new catheter device that was acquired only months before by UAMS.

As with the previous catheter attempts, Atherton and Erdem threaded the tiny device into a leg vein and all the way into the brain. “I was amazed at how quickly it dissolved the clot,” Atherton said. “We were able to restore blood flow within about an hour.”

The next day Deaton, 42, awoke from his coma, and a few months later, he was nearly back to full strength.

“I’m a little beside myself, thinking about how bad it was. I’m glad I came to UAMS, and I’m glad they could help.”

William Culp, M.D., who is leading a NIH-funded research of new stroke therapies at UAMS, stated that Glen’s treatment is a case where research helped the clinical care, and it took a team to make this happen.

UAMS Medical Services