Comfort Zone 2018-04-30T14:34:42+00:00
Comfort Zone
Special Thanks

While there are more than 60 named areas in the new hospital, we gratefully recognize the leadership gifts that provided the following areas:

The Frances M. and Ferd M. Bellingrath Jr. Intensive Care Unit Family Lounge

The Jackye and Curtis Finch Jr. Imaging Center Waiting Room

The Johnelle Hunt Pod – Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

The Klabzuba Foundation Patient Wing, Seventh Floor

The Jo and Harry Leggett Intensive Care Unit Family Lounge

The Bruce L. McEntire Jr. Imaging Center Reading Room

The Mozelle M. Nelson Multipurpose Education Room

The Peck Family Partnership Central Waiting Room – Intensive Care Unit

The Elizabeth J. Pruet Patient Assessment Center

The Josephine Raye and Doyle W. Rogers Lobby

The Dale and Lee Ronnel Patient Wing, Seventh Floor

The Dale and Lee Ronnel Interventional Medicine Waiting Area

The Schueck Family Foundation Patient Wing, Seventh Floor

The Josephine Smith Multipurpose Education Room, given in her memory by her parents Kathryn C. and Harrow Smith

The David E. Snowden Family
Emergency Department Waiting Room in honor of Christian Overton Snowden

The Tenenbaum Foundation
Trauma Center

The Tenenbaum Foundation Patient and Family Resource Center

The UAMS Consortium NICU Family Comfort Areas

The Patti and Richard Upton Multipurpose Education Room

The Judy C. Waller Café

Naming opportunities are still available. Please contact Cristy Sowell at (501) 526-5049 or Sue Williamson at (501) 686-5675 for more information.

A visit to UAMS in 2009 is like nothing before for both patients and visitors.

The hospital is new, there’s more parking, and every patient down to the tiniest of premature babies has his or her own room.

Those are the obvious changes. There are hundreds more smaller changes that make today’s UAMS experience better than ever.

Patient-centered Care More than 7,000 UAMS employees participated in training in 2008 to create a customer-centric service philosophy in patient care.

“We call this program the Circle of Excellence,” said Dick Pierson, vice chancellor for clinical programs and executive director of the UAMS Medical Center. “It’s all about creating a positive experience at UAMS for our patients and their families, and the hospital was designed with this philosophy in mind. We’re looking at opportunities to improve everything we do — from how we answer the phones to how we serve our patients’ meals and what colors we paint the walls.”

The new hospital brings with it a new parking deck, different drop-off locations, and unfamiliar routes in an already complex campus.

“The investment we made in signage, easy-to-understand maps and clearly marked paths along major routes between buildings is a good example of the work we’ve done for the convenience of our patients,” Pierson said. “Even though the new hospital seems removed from our other buildings from the outside, there are new connecting hallways that actually bring our outpatient clinics closer to our inpatient care.”

Changes in Store Design features and amenities throughout the new hospital create a warm and inviting yet functional environment for patients and families. From the soothing music of a grand piano in the lobby to the Family Resource Room filled with educational materials and books, patients and families will see a very different UAMS hospital.

On the fifth floor, parents of babies in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), will be able to spend the night in the baby’s private room and will have access to showers and kitchen and laundry facilities.

“The parents of these babies often want to spend as much time as possible with their children, and that’s been very difficult with our old nursery setting,” said Kristi Palmer, assistant NICU medical director. “The new hospital lets the parents stay in comfortable surroundings, and there’s even an area for older siblings to hang out and play during visits.” 

Family Support The new hospital has space on each 30-bed unit to provide patient and family resources unavailable in the 1950s-era hospital. For example, the new patient rooms are each large enough for a patient bed, a sleeper sofa, a private bath with shower, sink and toilet, an in-room sink and counter space, cabinets for personal items, and a desktop work area. Each patient room also will have wireless Internet access and a 26-inch flat-screen television.

Common areas on each unit include space for a nutrition work area where patients and family members can
get hot coffee, cold beverages and meals suited to their medical needs, even at times outside normal food
service hours.

“We worked with dozens of consultants on the design of the new hospital to ensure that it meets both the needs of our medical staff and those of our patients and their families,” said Pierson. “From the width of the halls and doorways to the amount of natural light and the selection of fabrics, every detail was addressed with patient care, efficiency and safety in mind.”

Family Support The new hospital has space on each 30-bed unit to provide patient and family resources unavailable in the 1950s-era hospital. For example, the new patient rooms are each large enough for a patient bed, a sleeper sofa, a private bath with shower, sink and toilet, an in-room sink and counter space, cabinets for personal items, and a desktop work area. Each patient room also will have wireless Internet access and a 26-inch flat-screen television.

Common areas on each unit include space for a nutrition work area where patients and family members can get hot coffee, cold beverages and meals suited to their medical needs, even at times outside normal food service hours.

“We worked with dozens of consultants on the design of the new hospital to ensure that it meets both the needs of our medical staff and those of our patients and their families,” said Pierson. “From the width of the halls and doorways to the amount of natural light and the selection of fabrics, every detail was addressed with patient care, efficiency and safety in mind.”