/////UAMS Team Finds More Education Improves Colon Cancer Screening Rates
UAMS Team Finds More Education Improves Colon Cancer Screening Rates 2018-01-05T09:19:45+00:00

OCT. 30, 2007 | Clinic-based patient education efforts can improve colon cancer screening rates, according to a study recently completed by University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) researchers and 19 other Arkansas health care providers.


 


The study, led by the UAMS Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, found that patients who watched a video about the risk of colon cancer and the screening procedure were more likely to request a screening than patients who did not view the video.


 


Colon cancer (also called colorectal cancer) is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States, but starts as a polyp and can be prevented if detected early. Arkansas ranks 12th highest in the nation for the number of colorectal cancer cases per year, but falls below the national average for the number of colorectal screenings.


 


The UAMS researchers joined with clinics in eight Arkansas cities and towns for the study, “Multi-level Approaches to Improve Colon Cancer Screening.”


 


“Patient education can be a vitally important element in preventative medicine, and we’re working to develop a highly effective approach to increase the rate of colon cancer screenings that can be incorporated into a wide range of primary care practices,” said Geoffrey Goldsmith, M.D., Garnett professor and chair of the UAMS Department of Family and Preventive Medicine. “We are pleased to be able to collaborate with these family physicians on research that we know can save lives.”


 


Goldsmith, the principal investigator in the study, said that in some cases a patient may avoid a colon cancer screening because they do not fully understand what is involved and are worried about pain or discomfort.


 


The 320 study participants were aged 51 to 75 and had never had a colon cancer screening or had not had a recent screening. Half of the participants were shown the video; the other half did not see the video.


 


Researchers contacted those who saw the video two months after their appointed and again six months after their appointment to see if a screening had been performed or scheduled. Those who did not see the video also were contacted to see if a screening had subsequently been conducted or scheduled.


 


The researchers found a screening rate of 39.4 percent in those who saw the video compared to the usual care group rate of 11.6 percent. The odds to be screened were 4.982 times greater for the experimental group compared to the usual care group, according to the study. 


 


 


The participating health care providers included:


 


·        Jose Abiseid, M.D., Family Practice CenterClinton


·        Les Anderson, M.D., Anderson Medical Clinic – Lonoke


·        Ronald Baker, M.D., Searcy Medical Center


·        Kevin Bay, M.D., Wildwood Family Clinic – Sherwood


·        Michael Beard, M.D., Bryant Family Clinic


·        Jennifer Faith, M.D., Searcy Medical Center


·        Herb Fendley, M.D., Arkansas Health Education CenterPine Bluff


·        Kenneth Heiles, D.O., Arkansas Health Education CenterPine Bluff


·        Michael Justus, M.D., Searcy Medical Center


·        Jack Lyon, M.D., Morrilton Medical Clinic


·        Jeff Mayfield, M.D., Baptist Health Family Clinic – Bryant


·        Joseph Nelsen, M.D. , Baptist Health Family Clinic – Bryant


·        Jonathan Norcross, M.D., Anderson Medical Clinic – Lonoke


·        Robbie Pickle, Advance Practice Nurse, Family Practice CenterClinton


·        Peter Post, M.D., Morrilton Medical Clinic


·        Harry Starnes, M.D., Starnes Family Clinic – Clinton


·        Garry Stewart, M.D., Valley Health Services – Perryville


·        Terani Williams, M.D., Arkansas Health Education CenterPine Bluff


·        Terry Yates, M.D., Searcy Medical Center


 


Goldsmith said that persons older than 50 should have a colon cancer screening that follows the American Cancer Society guidelines and is recommended by their family physician. Those with parents, grandparents or brothers and sisters who have been diagnosed with colon cancer, have an increase risk of developing the disease and should have screening every three to five years, he said.


 


The results of the research will be presented the upcoming national conferences of the American Association for Cancer Education, the North American Primary Care Research Groups and the American Academy of Family Physicians.


 


The research project is funded by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and the UAMS Department of Family and Preventive Medicine through its Arkansas Research Collaborative for Quality Improvement (ARC-QI). The goal of ARC-QI is to translate clinical research into family practice settings and to assist family practice sites in carrying out clinical studies. ARC-QI collaborated on this project with investigators from the Arkansas Cancer Research Center and the UAMS College of Public Health.


 


 


Links on This Page

UAMS Department of Family and Preventive Medicine: http://www.uams.edu/dfcm/


 


UAMS College of Medicine: http://www.uams.edu/COM/default.asp


 


Arkansas Collaborative for Quality Improvement: http://www.uams.edu/arc/