/////Kielian Receives Prestigious National Neurochemistry Award
Kielian Receives Prestigious National Neurochemistry Award 2018-01-05T09:16:52+00:00

MARCH 27, 2006 | Tammy Kielian, Ph.D., hopes the award she won recently from the American Society for Neurochemistry will do more than earn her praise from her colleagues.


While the recognition is pleasing, she would like to see the attention spark researchers’ interest in studying what she has devoted the last several years of her professional life to – infections in the central nervous system.


“Infections in the central nervous system typically don’t receive a lot of coverage in neuroscience meetings,” Kielian said. “I would like to make it more high profile.”


Kielian, assistant professor in the Department of Neurobiology and Developmental Sciences in the UAMS College of Medicine, was honored March 15 in Portland, Ore., with the Jordi Folch-Pi Award, one of the most prestigious given by the society.



I am very proud of the work Dr. Kielian has done and that the research she and her team have performed has been recognized at this national level,” said Gwen V. Childs, Ph.D., professor and chairman of the Department of Neurobiology and Developmental Sciences in the UAMS College of Medicine.


The award is given to an outstanding young investigator who has demonstrated a high level of research competence and originality, who has significantly advanced knowledge of neurochemistry and who shows a high degree of potential for future accomplishments.


It includes a $1,500 cash prize to be used for travel and as the recipient, Kielian will organize a symposium at the society’s 38th Annual Meeting being held in Cancun, Mexico.


At the ceremony, Monica Carson, Ph.D., of the University of California at Riverside talked about some of Kielian’s groundbreaking work. Kielian and her research group at UAMS were among the first to demonstrate the roll of Toll-like receptor 2 in the central nervous system in recognizing bacteria.


Carson also mentioned recent studies by Kielian’s team looking at the effects of inflammation on gap junction communication in the central nervous system.


“All of our studies have the common theme of Staphylococcus aureus in the central nervous system,” Kielian said. “We’ve developed a model of brain abscess that’s caused by that bacteria so we can look at the potential impact of human infection in the brain.”


At the Portland meeting, Kielian also organized a session on gap junctions and inflammation in the central nervous system. The session had a standing-room-only crowd.


For next year’s symposium topic, Kielian will organize a session that will focus on the role of glia in central nervous system infectious diseases. The symposium will highlight cutting-edge research in the field and will include world-renowned speakers in their respective fields.